IU’s Hannah Wilson: A Beautiful Life And Legacy Is The Premier Channel For All Sorority News Around The Globe.

The third weekend in April at Indiana University usually means that the greatest college weekend, Little 500, has arrived. Unreal parties, special guests around campus and a legendary bike race define the week. Though students cursed out the weather after the men’s race got postponed to Sunday, they still assumed the week would be the highlight of the 2015 for Hoosiers.

This year, though, the third weekend in April at Indiana University was defined not by partying, but by tragedy, lament, and heartbreak after senior Hannah Wilson was murdered.

While campus has been a whirlwind of rumors and speculation, what The Indy Star has confirmed is that Daniel E. Messel, 49, has been charged with the murder after his cell phone was found near Wilson’s feet. Wilson, who was found in a rural area about 30 minutes from her home on campus, died of blunt force trauma to the head.

For more details on the case, you can click here. Now, my lack of providing details is not me being a lazy journalist. I am intentionally being rather vague about the details of Wilson’s death, and this article will tell a story that no other news source has yet to really dive into: the story of Wilson’s life and the legacy she has left.

I feel like this is a much more important story that is not being told: the story of a young woman’s life, not the brutal, heart-wrenching story about how it ended. You may be asking where my credibility is to write about Hannah. Granted, I did not know her to the caliber that her family, her friends and her sorority sisters did, but I was lucky enough to meet Hannah before she passed away.

Hannah was a TA for my Human Sexuality course. Every Wednesday, she and another assistant would lead me and about ten other kids in a discussion section. Our small group would sit in a lecture hall built for a couple hundred, with Hannah usually sitting in front of us on the floor, casual as can be.

I admired her, and that is not always easy to say when you solely know somebody from her classroom personality. Still, Hannah was always genuine when speaking, passionate about her area of study and hilarious throughout the hour-long discussion.

Hannah was the perfect discussion leader for the human sexuality class, as she was intrigued by every facet of the topic from a young age. She grew up admiring the likes of Sue Johanson, the old lady who would give sex advice on a late-night television show. She got extra giddy and reminiscent of the days where she would sneak downstairs and watch the late-night show.

Hannah was going to take a gap year after she graduated to save money (smart girl, right?) She wanted to go to grad school so that she could become a licensed sex therapist and help people who felt they were struggling. You don’t have to be her best friend to tell that she was a naturally giving person, and it only seemed fitting that her dream career was to give other’s a better life.

Hannah was also a senior in Gamma Phi Beta, and was absolutely adored by her friends and sisters. Rightly so, because from the few encounters I was fortunate enough to have with her, I gathered that she was unapologetically herself and that she was accepting of people from all walks of life.

These minor details that I learned during my weekly classes with Hannah are simply scratching the surface. Her ability to shine and make everybody feel welcomed is something that I will greatly miss when going to class.

Though I wish Hannah was able to live out her remarkable life, I have no doubt that her legacy will live on through her loved ones. I even hope that her spirit will live on through anybody who hears her story, which is why I am writing this.

For those of you who were close with Hannah, my heart, thoughts and prayers are going out to you. For those of you who did not have the fortune of meeting her, I am sure that you can understand how heart wrenching this time is in the lives of her friends and family. For anybody who is reading this right now, I encourage to take a few things from Hannah’s story that I have gathered in the past few days.

While we never know what is going to happen to us in the future, we have the ability to make the most of what we are doing in the present. Hannah always had a smile on her face, always talked positively about others and even let us out of class early from time to time (that was always clutch.)

The impact she made while she was alive mirrors the impact her life will make on anybody who hears her story. While we wore different letters, were in different grades and had completely different stories, Wilson’s was one that I admire and wanted to share with you all. Whether you were her best friend or this is the first time you are hearing about Hannah Wilson, I hope that you keep her positivity, passion and story in your heart.

I also hope that you are reminded that life, while a precious gift, is completely unpredictable. We should live every day with caution, care and an aim to make others as happy as we want to be. Hug your sisters extra hard tonight, call your parents and tell them you love them and be thankful of your life.

Be safe, be compassionate, be Hannah.

Rest easy, Hannah.

Read More...

SOTD: Jojo Uriarte from Syracuse University Kappa Kappa Gamma Is The Premier Channel For All Sorority News Around The Globe.

Introducing Jojo from Syracuse University Kappa Kappa Gamma! Jojo not only is absolutely gorgeous, but she is a proud member of KKG doing great things for her chapter! Check out her photos below!

If you would like to be nominated as Sister of the Day for your chapter, e-mail [email protected]

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Letter To My Rush Crush Who Went To Another Chapter: I Am So Happy For You

Then I saw your name on the list for preference round and I was on Cloud Freaking 9. I started planning out the Instagram that we would take on bid-night. It would consist of a cheesy quote and all the happy emojis you can think of.

However, I never got to ‘Gram a picture of us on bid night, because you decided to go with a different chapter.

At first I went through all of the stages of grief. It started with depression. Although I was extremely happy with all of the babies that we ended up welcoming home on bid night, none of them were you.

Then it turned into anger. Like, why didn’t you choose us? We were going to have so much fun together and I was sure I was going to be your Big and we were going to braid each other’s hair and have wine nights.

Next was all the bargaining. I was hoping that you realized you made a mistake and that somehow, someway we could make a trade with your sorority. I seriously was trying to think of every way I could get you to somehow change your mind, go back in time and be in our chapter.

Finally, I had come to accept the fact that you were in a different chapter. Here’s the thing: I would have been so happy to get to know you on the level that I have gotten to know my sisters. But then I realized something: just because we are not in the same chapter does not mean we cannot still become buds.

Sure, it may not be as easy to get to know you as it would be if we lived in the same house, but people work through obstacles like that all the time. I also realize that you chose the chapter you thought that you fit into best. It is selfish of me to want you in my sorority for my own happiness.

So while I am still sad that things did not work out the way I wanted them to, I am so happy that things worked out in your favor. If they did not, you always know you can reach out. You know you will always be an honorary member of my sorority in my heart.

Still bitter but I’ll get over it,

Your Rusher Crusher.

PS- I hope to see you out at a party so we can bond and dance and do all the things we avoided talking about during recruitment.

Read More...

IU’s Hannah Wilson: A Beautiful Life And Legacy Is The Premier Channel For All Sorority News Around The Globe.

The third weekend in April at Indiana University usually means that the greatest college weekend, Little 500, has arrived. Unreal parties, special guests around campus and a legendary bike race define the week. Though students cursed out the weather after the men’s race got postponed to Sunday, they still assumed the week would be the highlight of the 2015 for Hoosiers.

This year, though, the third weekend in April at Indiana University was defined not by partying, but by tragedy, lament, and heartbreak after senior Hannah Wilson was murdered.

While campus has been a whirlwind of rumors and speculation, what The Indy Star has confirmed is that Daniel E. Messel, 49, has been charged with the murder after his cell phone was found near Wilson’s feet. Wilson, who was found in a rural area about 30 minutes from her home on campus, died of blunt force trauma to the head.

For more details on the case, you can click here. Now, my lack of providing details is not me being a lazy journalist. I am intentionally being rather vague about the details of Wilson’s death, and this article will tell a story that no other news source has yet to really dive into: the story of Wilson’s life and the legacy she has left.

I feel like this is a much more important story that is not being told: the story of a young woman’s life, not the brutal, heart-wrenching story about how it ended. You may be asking where my credibility is to write about Hannah. Granted, I did not know her to the caliber that her family, her friends and her sorority sisters did, but I was lucky enough to meet Hannah before she passed away.

Hannah was a TA for my Human Sexuality course. Every Wednesday, she and another assistant would lead me and about ten other kids in a discussion section. Our small group would sit in a lecture hall built for a couple hundred, with Hannah usually sitting in front of us on the floor, casual as can be.

I admired her, and that is not always easy to say when you solely know somebody from her classroom personality. Still, Hannah was always genuine when speaking, passionate about her area of study and hilarious throughout the hour-long discussion.

Hannah was the perfect discussion leader for the human sexuality class, as she was intrigued by every facet of the topic from a young age. She grew up admiring the likes of Sue Johanson, the old lady who would give sex advice on a late-night television show. She got extra giddy and reminiscent of the days where she would sneak downstairs and watch the late-night show.

Hannah was going to take a gap year after she graduated to save money (smart girl, right?) She wanted to go to grad school so that she could become a licensed sex therapist and help people who felt they were struggling. You don’t have to be her best friend to tell that she was a naturally giving person, and it only seemed fitting that her dream career was to give other’s a better life.

Hannah was also a senior in Gamma Phi Beta, and was absolutely adored by her friends and sisters. Rightly so, because from the few encounters I was fortunate enough to have with her, I gathered that she was unapologetically herself and that she was accepting of people from all walks of life.

These minor details that I learned during my weekly classes with Hannah are simply scratching the surface. Her ability to shine and make everybody feel welcomed is something that I will greatly miss when going to class.

Though I wish Hannah was able to live out her remarkable life, I have no doubt that her legacy will live on through her loved ones. I even hope that her spirit will live on through anybody who hears her story, which is why I am writing this.

For those of you who were close with Hannah, my heart, thoughts and prayers are going out to you. For those of you who did not have the fortune of meeting her, I am sure that you can understand how heart wrenching this time is in the lives of her friends and family. For anybody who is reading this right now, I encourage to take a few things from Hannah’s story that I have gathered in the past few days.

While we never know what is going to happen to us in the future, we have the ability to make the most of what we are doing in the present. Hannah always had a smile on her face, always talked positively about others and even let us out of class early from time to time (that was always clutch.)

The impact she made while she was alive mirrors the impact her life will make on anybody who hears her story. While we wore different letters, were in different grades and had completely different stories, Wilson’s was one that I admire and wanted to share with you all. Whether you were her best friend or this is the first time you are hearing about Hannah Wilson, I hope that you keep her positivity, passion and story in your heart.

I also hope that you are reminded that life, while a precious gift, is completely unpredictable. We should live every day with caution, care and an aim to make others as happy as we want to be. Hug your sisters extra hard tonight, call your parents and tell them you love them and be thankful of your life.

Be safe, be compassionate, be Hannah.

Rest easy, Hannah.

Read More...

SOTD: Lauren Maune from University of Arizona Sigma Kappa Is The Premier Channel For All Sorority News Around The Globe.

Introducing Lauren from UofA Sigma Kappa. Lauren is a proud member of her chapter and reps her letters 24/7. She is a great asset to the Sigma Kappa chapter and continues to do great things! Check out her photos below!

If you would like to be nominated as Sister of the Day for your chapter, e-mail [email protected]

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IU’s Hannah Wilson: A Beautiful Life And Legacy

The third weekend in April at Indiana University usually means that the greatest college weekend, Little 500, has arrived. Unreal parties, special guests around campus and a legendary bike race define the week. Though students cursed out the weather after the men’s race got postponed to Sunday, they still assumed the week would be the highlight of the 2015 for Hoosiers.

This year, though, the third weekend in April at Indiana University was defined not by partying, but by tragedy, lament, and heartbreak after senior Hannah Wilson was murdered.

While campus has been a whirlwind of rumors and speculation, what The Indy Star has confirmed is that Daniel E. Messel, 49, has been charged with the murder after his cell phone was found near Wilson’s feet. Wilson, who was found in a rural area about 30 minutes from her home on campus, died of blunt force trauma to the head.

For more details on the case, you can click here. Now, my lack of providing details is not me being a lazy journalist. I am intentionally being rather vague about the details of Wilson’s death, and this article will tell a story that no other news source has yet to really dive into: the story of Wilson’s life and the legacy she has left.

I feel like this is a much more important story that is not being told: the story of a young woman’s life, not the brutal, heart-wrenching story about how it ended. You may be asking where my credibility is to write about Hannah. Granted, I did not know her to the caliber that her family, her friends and her sorority sisters did, but I was lucky enough to meet Hannah before she passed away.

Hannah was a TA for my Human Sexuality course. Every Wednesday, she and another assistant would lead me and about ten other kids in a discussion section. Our small group would sit in a lecture hall built for a couple hundred, with Hannah usually sitting in front of us on the floor, casual as can be.

I admired her, and that is not always easy to say when you solely know somebody from her classroom personality. Still, Hannah was always genuine when speaking, passionate about her area of study and hilarious throughout the hour-long discussion.

Hannah was the perfect discussion leader for the human sexuality class, as she was intrigued by every facet of the topic from a young age. She grew up admiring the likes of Sue Johanson, the old lady who would give sex advice on a late-night television show. She got extra giddy and reminiscent of the days where she would sneak downstairs and watch the late-night show.

Hannah was going to take a gap year after she graduated to save money (smart girl, right?) She wanted to go to grad school so that she could become a licensed sex therapist and help people who felt they were struggling. You don’t have to be her best friend to tell that she was a naturally giving person, and it only seemed fitting that her dream career was to give other’s a better life.

Hannah was also a senior in Gamma Phi Beta, and was absolutely adored by her friends and sisters. Rightly so, because from the few encounters I was fortunate enough to have with her, I gathered that she was unapologetically herself and that she was accepting of people from all walks of life.

These minor details that I learned during my weekly classes with Hannah are simply scratching the surface. Her ability to shine and make everybody feel welcomed is something that I will greatly miss when going to class.

Though I wish Hannah was able to live out her remarkable life, I have no doubt that her legacy will live on through her loved ones. I even hope that her spirit will live on through anybody who hears her story, which is why I am writing this.

For those of you who were close with Hannah, my heart, thoughts and prayers are going out to you. For those of you who did not have the fortune of meeting her, I am sure that you can understand how heart wrenching this time is in the lives of her friends and family. For anybody who is reading this right now, I encourage to take a few things from Hannah’s story that I have gathered in the past few days.

While we never know what is going to happen to us in the future, we have the ability to make the most of what we are doing in the present. Hannah always had a smile on her face, always talked positively about others and even let us out of class early from time to time (that was always clutch.)

The impact she made while she was alive mirrors the impact her life will make on anybody who hears her story. While we wore different letters, were in different grades and had completely different stories, Wilson’s was one that I admire and wanted to share with you all. Whether you were her best friend or this is the first time you are hearing about Hannah Wilson, I hope that you keep her positivity, passion and story in your heart.

I also hope that you are reminded that life, while a precious gift, is completely unpredictable. We should live every day with caution, care and an aim to make others as happy as we want to be. Hug your sisters extra hard tonight, call your parents and tell them you love them and be thankful of your life.

Be safe, be compassionate, be Hannah.

Rest easy, Hannah.

Read More...

Say Hello To Gamma Rho Lambda: The First National Lesbian Sorority

In 2003, Gamma Rho Lambda was founded at Arizona State University. In 2015, they have 15 active chapters in three different colonies across the nation. There is something that allows Gamma Rho Lambda to stand out from other chapters on most campuses: they are considered the first national lesbian sorority.

Gamma Rho Lambda is a sorority that strives for, “tolerance, diversity, unity, and trust,” as is said in their mission statement. While they are considered an LBT (Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender) sorority, they do accept heterosexual allies with open arms.

Greek communities throughout the nation tend to get exposed for all they do that is wrong, so I thought I would take a moment to point out a moment in Greek life (though there are many) where something was done oh so right, and that is the founding of Gamma Rho Lambda.

There are some crazy stereotypes about sorority girls out there, one of which being that you cannot be lesbian, bisexual, transgender or identify as queer and be in a sorority at the same time. Sorority life is all about being accepted for all that you are, all that you are not and all that you can be. Thanks to Gamma Rho Lambda, the Greek community is busting the myth that they want to bring women of various sexual orientations and gender identities down, and instead are lifting them up by providing them with a chapter that was created to welcome the LBT community and their allies into the Greek community.

I wanted to introduce you all as readers and as fellow Greeks (and perhaps non-Greeks who are reading this article) to the massive support system that the Greek community can be. While your college may not have a Gamma Rho Lambda like mine, I take solace in knowing that one day I could very well see these letters being worn on my campus. What makes me even more happy, though, is that I still get to call these women my PanHellenic sisters.

That is the beautiful thing about Greek life – it truly does encourage its members to be their best selves. While mistakes are made along the way (some bigger than others) the Greek community has been taking incredible strides as progressing and making sure that traditions change to fit the current time and culture that we live in today.

To all the women of Gamma Rho Lambda, congratulations on being forward thinkers and inspiring Greek women and men throughout the United States. Though it may not be much, we at SororityLyfe.com are happy to deem you the “Sisters Of The Day.” Keep on unifying and keep on tolerating – this world needs women like you to set a good example.

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An Open Letter To My Rush Crush Who Went To Another Chapter: I Am So Happy For You

Dear Rush Crush,

When I met you during recruitment I knew you were so special. The moment that you left I started telling all of my sisters how perfect you were and how I was going to die if you did not come back for the next round.

Then I saw your name on the list for preference round and I was on Cloud Freaking 9. I started planning out the Instagram that we would take on bid-night. It would consist of a cheesy quote and all the happy emojis you can think of.

However, I never got to ‘Gram a picture of us on bid night, because you decided to go with a different chapter.

At first I went through all of the stages of grief. It started with depression. Although I was extremely happy with all of the babies that we ended up welcoming home on bid night, none of them were you.

Then it turned into anger. Like, why didn’t you choose us? We were going to have so much fun together and I was sure I was going to be your Big and we were going to braid each other’s hair and have wine nights.

Next was all the bargaining. I was hoping that you realized you made a mistake and that somehow, someway we could make a trade with your sorority. I seriously was trying to think of every way I could get you to somehow change your mind, go back in time and be in our chapter.

Finally, I had come to accept the fact that you were in a different chapter. Here’s the thing: I would have been so happy to get to know you on the level that I have gotten to know my sisters. But then I realized something: just because we are not in the same chapter does not mean we cannot still become buds.

Sure, it may not be as easy to get to know you as it would be if we lived in the same house, but people work through obstacles like that all the time. I also realize that you chose the chapter you thought that you fit into best. It is selfish of me to want you in my sorority for my own happiness.

So while I am still sad that things did not work out the way I wanted them to, I am so happy that things worked out in your favor. If they did not, you always know you can reach out. You know you will always be an honorary member of my sorority in my heart.

Still bitter but I’ll get over it,

Your Rusher Crusher.

PS- I hope to see you out at a party so we can bond and dance and do all the things we avoided talking about during recruitment.

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An Open Letter To The Sorority Social Chair

Dear Sorority Social Chair,

Girlfriend, I cannot even begin to thank you for what you bring to our chapter. While a social life is not the most important aspect of a college career, it still is a crucial aspect to having an enjoyable time during your four years of undergrad. Thanks to you, we are given the greatest opportunities.

You are basically the coolest party planner to roam this Earth. Now, I have seen my fair share of meltdowns from my Mom when she planned parties for birthdays, graduations and other celebrations, so believe me when I say your job is not one that I envy. You stay calm, cool and collected in the name of good times and themed parties.

The job of the social chair is important because they allow their sisters to have some fun and blow off some steam once the weekend rolls around. Sometimes they even allow the weekend to come early and find something to do on a Tuesday. Whichever day and whatever the event, sorority girls all over the world have their social chairs to thank for setting it up.

Can we also talk about what a stellar interpersonal communicator you are? Chatting with fraternity socials and other event coordinators is no easy task, but you are able to do so effortlessly. Seriously, I hope that you have put that on your resume, because it is a skill you can take right to the bank.

The most impressive thing about all that you do is just that — you do it all! You plan these events, you make sure to go to them and you still manage to be a full-time student in college. I tip my hat to you, because I know how hard it must be at times. I have seen my social go out on nights where she had two exams the next day, something I would never be able to do.

So thank you for helping us with our social calendars, showing us a good time and always being ready to have fun with your sisters. You seriously bring the life to the party.

All Our Love,

Your Sorority Sisters

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SOTD: Morgan Paige Bentley From Indiana University Southeast Alpha Phi

Introducing Morgan Paige Bentley from Indiana University Southeast’s Alpha Phi! We found out that Morgan had a slightly different story than most sorority sisters out there, so we wanted her to be a “Sister Of The Day” and have a chance to tell her story!

Indiana University Southeast Alpha

Sorority Lyfe

Hi! My name is Morgan. I am an Alpha Phi at Indiana University Southeast. I chose to go to IUS because it was close to home, a great price, and had a great Greek Life Program! I knew from the moment I enrolled at IUS that I wanted Alpha Phi. I had heard great things about their philanthropy and sisterhood and that was exactly what I wanted from a sorority. I had a great time going through rush and meeting the women of Alpha Phi. The more sisters I talked to, the more I was reassured that this was the sisterhood for me. I chose to go Alpha Phi because I felt like I belonged there and I was right. I love Alpha Phi and all of my sisters and wouldn’t change a thing for the world! I also have a special situation, I am 19 years old and engaged! Yay! I have been with my fiancé since I was 14 years old (and no, we have never had a break up). He popped the question on Valentine’s Day 2014 and, obviously, I said “Yes!” I chose to get engaged young because I know where I am in life and I know that this is where my life was heading anyway, plus I couldn’t wait any longer if I tried! We are getting married on September 19th, 2015 and couldn’t be happier. I get a lot of grief for being engaged at 19, but those people can mind their own. It can be hard balancing school, work, Alpha Phi, and wedding planning…but with the help of my sisters, family, and fiancé, things are working out alright. If you are considering getting engaged young or while in college, I say “Go for it!” if you love each other enough to get married, you can survive a few hard years in college! Follow your heart and don’t let anyone get in your way.

Love and AOE <3

 

 

 

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SOTD: Julie Schott From Penn State Kappa Alpha Theta

Introducing Julie Schott from Penn State University’s Kappa Alpha Theta!  Julie was brought to our attention by her sorority sister, Caroline Eldh. When we received Caroline’s email, we knew that Julie exemplified what we look for in a “Sister Of The Day.”

As Caroline states, Julie plays a huge role in everyone’s lives within the chapter. She is constantly a voice of reason, and whenever someone needs help, or needs advice, she is the person that everyone goes to immediately. Julie is known campus-wide, and not only is she a supportive sister, but hilarious and the life of every party.

Julie Schott From Penn State Kappa Alpha Theta is the real deal! Every sorority girl has the chance to become the “Sister Of The Day.” If you would like to be a “Sister Of The Day,” and/or have a sister to nominate, please email us at [email protected]

Penn State Kappa Alpha Theta

Sorority Lyfe

 

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SOTD: Jordan Dollenger From Ole Miss Phi Mu

Introducing Jordan from Ole Miss Phi Mu!!! Jordan is known for being drop dead gorgeous and having a perfect smile. Ok ok ok, she’s known for WAY more than just that! She’s known for being loved by her sisters and always being there for anyone who needs a helping hand! Check out her pictures below!

If you would like to be nominated as Sister of the Day for your chapter, e-mail [email protected]

 

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